A change-agent in TB and HIV treatment for impoverished communities… a visit with Global Health Committee

Feb 29, 2012: I met with Dr. Sok Thim, co-founder and Executive Director, and Ung Prahors, Deputy Director, of Cambodian Health Committee in order to learn more about and visit the Khmer Soviet Friendship Hospital providing health care for impoverished communities affected by Tuburculosis and HIV for free, and visit the Maddox Chivan Children’s Center, a social and educational care center for children infected or affected by HIV/AIDs.

The day started with an introduction and background of Cambodian Health Committee and how it has developed into the now, Global Health Committee, in response to an expansion and replication of the successful local model of treatment and care. Dr. Sok Thim, co-founder, shared his inspiring story about surviving the  horrors of Khmer Rouge regime and the life-path that brought him to his experience and expertise in medical care via HIV treatment for impoverished communities (beginning in Cambodia-Thailand refugee camps with USAID). Through his experiences and developed expertise as well as Dr. Anne Goldfeld’s work as Senior Investigator at the Immune Disease Institute of Children’s Hospital Boston and a member of the Infectious Disease Division at Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston, together they created CHC. Even against all obstacles (such as refusal to mold program design and mission in order to fit bureaucratic demands) they persevered, and 10 years later earned the recognition they most deserved from local and international community. CHC’s model was so effective that its research has been published in the National Science Journal as well as is being replicated for Cambodia’s Ministry of Health. CHC has been asked to work with government hospitals and staff and is now focusing on improve quality of medical care through staff training.

In waiting play room with kids and families

I was able to meet several of the children who were being treated by Cambodian Health Committee, as well as their families. One woman was there because one child had HIV and the others did not – so the CHC made sure her and her baby were taken care of as well in order to accomodate for their long trek to get treatment for her child.  This waiting room was specifically a play room for kids waiting for treatment and care – full of toys, books, and tv!

CHC provided transportation for her to get to school and to the hospital. This was a major hope for Cambodian Health Committee to get more vehicles to safely transport their patients to receive treatment on a regular basis.


Gifts from the U.S.

We went up to the main CHC hospital office, and I was able to see the CAMELIA headquarters – a published research collaboration between US, French, and Cambodian clinicians and scientists. The office was an open space used for meetings and tracking HIV and TB cases all over the country on a giant, pin-board, wall map – with color coding to signify different types of medicine-immune cases. I learned that they also have field staff and social workers that go into the communities and work with patients once they can be returned to their homes. CHC believes that the best way to heal is under the least stressors and in their homes (as long as it is safe to go home for families) – as opposed to the traditional belief that patients should stay 100% in the hospital under observation.

with Cambodian Health Committee Staff and government staff

The staff I met explained that because of CHC they were able to provide care and treatment that they would not have been able to with the government program and budget. Cambodian Health Committee was able to fill the gaps and work synchronisticaly with the Cambodian Ministry of Health, supporting each other’s research, treatment, and care for their patients. Another staff member said that because of CHC support, they were able to revamp and improve facilities which were previously very old.

At the end, we visited the Maddox Chivan Children’s Center which provides active educational, medical and nutritional support for over 300 children from 179 families and provides lunch for approximately 130 children each day (source:Global Health Committee).

Kids playing soccer

Nap time

This was so cute, during the tour we came across nap time, it was adorable to see them all peacefully resting after a long day of school and play!

The MCCC playground and artwork done by Friends International beneficiaries! (Click here to read my post about FriendsInternational)

with Maddox Chivan Children’s Center kids

It was so wonderful and joyous – as soon as the kids heard the word picture, they came running and piling on top of each other to be in it. By the end of taking this shot we all were falling over and laughing so hard. The whole time the kids were coming up to me to say “Hello! What is your name?!”


with MCCC Staff and Kids – please note the angry birds picture in the middle. Kids love Angry Birds here!

It was a delightful and incredible day spent with the kids at MCCC as well as with the committed and driven staff at the hospital and Cambodian Health Committee office. On a personal note, it was difficult to witness people suffering through HIV and TB, but after seeing the care and research behind their treatment, and despite the patients’ difficulties, their strength and ability to smile and laugh still – was inspirational and soul-moving.

Some future goals for GHC that Dr. Sok and Prahors shared with me included (1) replication globally, (2) a 10-year program in human resource development medical training specifically for poor-family and communities care and support (this is to change the atmosphere with medical care in these communities to focus on staff attitude to create quality service), and (3) more vehicles to safely transport patients who have little to no way to go and receive care and treatment at the hospital.

A little side note – yes this is Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt with Global Health Committee head staff (including Dr. Anne Goldfeld). Angelina and Brad are supporters and funders of GHC programs as well as helped create the Maddox Chivan Children’s Center (named after their adopted son, Maddox, who is from Cambodia) and the upcoming Zara Children’s Center in Ethiopia (named after their adopted daughter Zara from Ethiopia). To learn more about Angelina’s participation click here.

To learn more about Global Health Committee: Click here.

Jacqueline
GlobalGiving InTheField Traveler | Texas

Jacqueline is an InTheField Traveler with GlobalGiving and is now making her way across Southeast Asia. Jacqueline has lived all around the U.S., Central America, backpacked along Australia’s eastern coast while volunteering for the National Park Service, western Europe, and traveled around the world. You can also follow her via Twitter.

For more information about GlobalGiving, click here

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