What happens after treatment stops? Palliative Care in Indonesia

On July 24, I accompanied Rachel House on a home visit to one of its patients – a 7-year-old boy who has leukemia and relapsed just before he was supposed to start the new school year.

After visiting Rachel House’s office to meet the staff and nurses, we were off to the young patient’s grandmother’s home where he and his mother stay.  They stay here so that he can be closer to treatment and support.  The mother and grandmother welcomed us with warm, sincere smiles. The patient had been improving until recently.

When we arrived, the nurse discussed the patient’s symptoms with the mom, brought him a new backpack since he was hoping to return to school, and consulted the mother on his oral chemotherapy. Because some families do not know how to access Indonesia’s free health care, the staff of Rachel house assists and guides them in the process from registration to accessing it.  Families supported in this community are laborers, have no jobs, supported by their families, or ojek drivers (motorbike taxis).  Palliative care is not well-known in the country, and people do not know what to do when their loved ones are sent home from the hospital to die. The families often don’t have emotional support, counseling, or even explanations on what will happen to the patient before he or she passes away. Rachel House was created to fill that need and support these families until the end.

As I observed Rachel House staff with the family they were not like outsiders stepping in to advise on the family’s lives, Rachel House was a part of the family – connecting on a personal level instead of via a chart. One of the nurses explained that this is why she joined Rachel House. She said that working in a hospital, one would feel a bit separated since the charts dictated everything. Here she can support the family on an emotional level and connect more.

After the visit, we parted with the family and the grandmother had tears. She said she was so happy to have the support of the nurses coming to their home. Her grandson was weak and could rest at home. Rachel House hopes to be able to provide this kind of support for other diseases in addition to cancer and HIV. Additionally, they hope to recruit new nurses while expanding awareness and understanding of palliative care in Indonesia.  This is one of those organizations that remind me of why I began to work in the non-profit and foundation field. It is meeting needs that are not being met, and supporting those that have fallen through the cracks to improve the care and basic rights of humanity.

Learn more about and support the work of Rachel House here: http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/rachel-house-pediatric-hospice-in-indonesia-cancer-hiv/

Anarchists? Rockers? How about a Homeless World Cup Team supporting the marginalized in Indonesia

Trophies from the HWC 2011

Trophies from the HWC 2011

July 23, I met with Rumah Cemara, an organization that played in the Homeless World Cup 2011 representing Indonesia. Immediately I knew it was not an organization like others – every person I met was not only laid back, cool, and “against the grain”… every person I spoke with was inspiring and open to share the challenges and experiences faced throughout life.

What type of challenges and experiences am I writing about? Rumah Cemara was created to increase the quality of life for former drug users with HIV/AIDS, provide care and social support, treatment, and decreasing discrimination in the community through outreach.  When I walked in I could feel the openness and lack of hierarchy within the organization and its members. Everyone mingled with everyone; there was no restrictive bureaucracy – just a safe, nurturing, and growing environment.

When touring the organization, it was great to see the Homeless World Cup 2011 trophies for “Best New Team” and “6th in Tournament”.  After taking a tour, I sat down with Ginan, the founder, and he explained that being a part of Homeless World Cup was a life-changing experience. He never dreamed that “people like us can represent our country in a world class tournament.” He said that the tournament is not just a game, it’s about change within yourself. When I spoke with another player, who played as a defender in the tournament, he said he loved being able to play soccer with people from all over the world. He had never met people from those countries before, and he said meeting them was exciting. What was his favorite part about the tournament? “That people like ‘us’ can represent the name of our country.”  When he returned, he felt very excited and proud, especially when returning to Bandung. People were cheering for the team at the airport, and that day “I was crying… crying because I felt so proud.”

Rumah Cemara provides these marginalized youth an opportunity to have a safe environment, a family, and a trusting network to connect with, learn from, and grow with.  Why do they do football/soccer programs? Ginan and staff say because It is an effective way to spread the message of Rumah Cemara and to bridge the gap with the local community, decreasing stigma and discrimination. Rumah Cemara is a place to be free for anyone and everyone – a place to be themselves. Rumah Cemara hopes that Indonesia can be a place without discrimination.

Interviewing Rumah Cemara Founder about the HWC

Interviewing Rumah Cemara Founder about the HWC

Speaking w/ a Rumah Cemara member and HWC player

Speaking w/ a Rumah Cemara member and HWC player
To learn more about this organization be sure and check them out here: http://www.rumahcemara.org/

Meeting needs for youth in Indonesia – My day with YUM

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On July 17, I was able to visit the first, and still the only, library provided by Yayasan Usaha Mulia, or YUM, in the community of Cipanas, Indonesia. The families there consist of farmers, labor workers, and vegetable sellers at the markets.

When not in school, local youth have the opportunity to get tutored and participate in activities at the library like educational games, creative arts & crafts, and movies – when I arrived the children were making school schedules to take home. These included coloring, drawing, and cutting out shapes to make it their own while learning the days of the week.  These youth were ages 6-12. The older kids were working on the computers, and the younger ones were drawing pictures. It was fun to see how each group of younger children had a general theme they decided to draw – one group drawing a home and another drawing elephants and fish. The library was colorful, encouraging creativity, safety, with the walls filled with books, dictionaries, novels, and more. I also saw the “boxes of books” which is part of the mobile library program for other communities’ schools. YUM’s goal is to add more schools to its current 2 where it provides books. These are the first “libraries” in these communities.

I asked the librarian what he did before working at this one, and he said he was a teacher at the government schools. He said the schools lacked expression and creativity for the children, so when he was introduced to the opportunity at YUM, he was happy to join.

After, I went on to see the vocational training program, the organic gardens, and meet the community. I met YUM’s bookkeeper. When he was in 4th grade he was orphaned, so he was brought to YUM’s center. He stayed in YUM’s program and now works for the organization. I asked him to describe YUM and he said, “a place where you are happy.” The first program I saw that day was the sewing class. This program teaches young adults to make clothes, bags, and using recycled scraps for creative products. I sat down with one of the students, a young man who hoped to one day become a tailor and design his own clothes.  I then spoke with another young woman named Aji who was 16 and in her 3rd year of senior high school. I asked her why she took sewing class, and she said because she could make more friends and she wanted to be a professional designer. All of the youth explained to me when they are not in school they are usually helping the family or working. The classes had not only young women, but also a few young men working just as hard to develop skills for a career after.

Next, I sat in on the computer-training course. The 2 trainers were former students of the class themselves. The girl trainer explained to me she wanted to go to school, but after elementary her parents could not pay. YUM helped pay for her costs and now she loves math, hopes to share her knowledge, and to attend university to be a chemical engineer. She was an extremely bright and mature young woman still in high school. Aris, from YUM, explained to me 75% of youth going through the vocational training program receive jobs. If they don’t get a job, local youth marry young or become a domestic or labor workers.

Finally, the staff took me to visit the local community as well as explore the organic gardens planted by local schools and students. See the pictures in the slide show – it was such an incredible and inspiring experience to not only meet the children of Cipanas, but also to get to know the staff behind the impact-organization, YUM.

How to turn trash into jobs, education, and laptop bags – Day with XS

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On July 20, I was able to visit XS Project, an organization turning trash into quality products, creating jobs, and providing educational scholarships.

I arrived to the office and met staff doing everything from sorting and cleaning loads of trash, unused car seat covers, and old marketing banners, to working on product development, and sewing the products. I sat down with one of the sewers, and he explained he had been with XS since 2005. What brought him here? He said a friend was working at XS. He used to make seat covers for airplanes, but now he can make products from recycled products. At the time, the team was putting together very cool laptop cases created from a combination of seat covers and discarded marketing banners.

I then met the head of product design and the head of finance.  The head of finance explained, XS is “not just cleaning the environment, but it is creating jobs for those who need it. XS is also providing education scholarships – it’s like 3-in-1.” The head of product design explained that he was first introduced to XS in college and thought it would be a great challenge to create products out of recycled material.

After meeting the staff and watching the process of turning recycled material into new goods, Retno and I went to visit the community where it all starts – the trash pickers. When we arrived the kids were so excited and everyone came out to say hi and play. Retno brought a box of pencils and crayons gathered from other schools, and the children all dove in to grab their handfuls. We stopped to speak with every family and to hear their current needs and issues. The families live on this land and work for a “lampak” which is the boss of that trash picker community.

I asked the kids what they studied and they all shouted out, “math, Bahasa (Indonesian), Ingrish (English), and Quran reading!” I then asked a few what they wanted to be when they grow up – and 2 young girls said a chef and teacher. Another young girl said a doctor. XS provides funding for the children’s schooling directly to the school and follows up with the school and teachers to see how their progress is. Retno encouraged the moms to tell their kids to go to class. In this community, the parents’ generation mostly did not attend school so this is a new opportunity for their children.

FED/GHRE Filling the Gap for Burmese Migrants’ Rights in Thailand

On June 18 I visited Foundation for Education and Development/Grassroots Human Rights Education and Development in southern Thailand – a place called Khao Lak.

Burmese migrants’ children ready to learn thanks to Grassroots Human Rights Education And Development

The first project I witnessed was the community leader training. Burmese migrants from fisheries, plantations, and construction who came to Thailand to find work had gathered for a 2-day training. These attendees were receiving training for improving and leading community development. All were from the Phang Nga province and were there to also network with each other.  The founder said that part of the training’s purpose it to increase the awareness of the migrants’ human and labor rights. Many workers come to Thailand not knowing their rights, which then are abused by those in authority like the plantation  owners, construction company owners, and immigration authorities.

The temporary shelter and women’s center – additional services provided to Burmese migrants by FED/GHRE

The second project I visited was the education program for the Burmese migrants’ children – FED/GHRE wants to protect children’s rights by encouraging that they don’t have to work or marry young… they can stay in school. Awareness is not just for children but for the parents as well.  I sat in on activities from preschool age to the young adult, youth outreach program.  The older children receive traditional schooling in addition to democracy and human rights training.

Preschool Class

In Thailand the problem is that to integrate migrant students into public schools, money and language-fluency in Thai is required, which many children of Burmese migrants don’t have. Additionally, transportation to these schools is not easy therefore students are provided transportation via the FED/GHRE truck from certain areas to the FED/GHRE school.

One FED/GHRE staff member I met had joined this organization at age 12 and continued through the program. She is now 19 and a translator for the organization. She said without FED/GHRE she probably would probably not have any opportunity and have to marry young or work in a plantation like many of her peers. I was able to also speak with a FED/GHRE recipient who has been integrated to a Thai school. He said he has both Thai and Burmese friends there and enjoys playing football as well as art class because he loves to draw mountains and landscapes.

Before I left, I was able to stop in one last time and observe a school celebration of Aung Suu Kyi’s birthday. The students were quizzed on historical events, the life of Aung Suu Kyi, and then watched a short documentary. Although there have been public changes within (Burma)Myanmar, change has not been seen in this area with an increase in new students arriving everyday.  This group of multilingual Burmese youth in Thailand will grow up not only with math and language skills, but a with a global mindset trained in democracy and human rights.

Aung Suu Kyi’s Birthday Celebration

GlobalGiving InTheField Representative | Texas

Jacqueline is an InTheField Traveler with GlobalGiving and is now making her way across Southeast Asia. Jacqueline has lived all around the U.S., Central America, backpacked along Australia’s eastern coast while volunteering for the National Park Service, western Europe, and traveled around the world. You can also follow her via Twitter.

For more information about GlobalGiving, click here. 

A hand-up, not hand-outs for youth and families in Thailand

I was able to visit 2 organizations meeting needs of those in the Bangkok community that are disadvantaged or are affected in some way by HIV – both organizations give a hand up not a hand out. The first organization, Siam-Care, provides economic and educational opportunities while the second organization I met with, Step Ahead, provides business training, personal development, and micro-loans for existing entrepreneurs.

At Siam-Care I met 2 young women, one is studying finance and the other an international law student. One of the young women had been brought in at 12 years old for support by her “adopted” mother because she lost family from HIV/AIDS. She now financially supports her siblings. The other young woman was an orphan and studies law because she is interested in law and justice. We discussed that if they were not at Siam-Care they would be at higher risk for trafficking and or abusive work situations. Many youth migrate uninformed to large cities like Bangkok to support their families or themselves if they don’t have families. With the support of Siam-Care they can stay in school, receive education and support, and aim for professional careers like accounting, medicine, and law. The last youth I met was a young man that a relative brought in because his mom died when he was 5 of HIV and his father passed away when he was 2. He is now in school, part time working at KFC, and studying to be a computer programmer. He also is interested in giving back and volunteering – he even asked about volunteering for GlobalGiving!

The issue is that it is free to “sit in a classroom” but families have to pay for everything else including books, uniforms, and even specific haircuts. If the students don’t have this, they can’t attend.

Step Ahead is located near a slum community of Bangkok, Khlong Toei. After meeting staff and seeing the gorgeous purses that women are able to make with Step Ahead in order to earn income, I accompanied the founder, John, and a staff member to meet those receiving mentoring, training, and microloans. Additionally, Step Ahead hosts basketball and event days for local youth.

Working through local districts, Step Ahead first hosted meetings to reach out to the community. In the slums, people either live in tall government projects that have about 250 rooms and about 1500 people per building or they live in shacks between buildings through winding alleys. These homes are made from bits and pieces of scrap metals and wood all stacked on top and in between each other. Walking through Khlong Toei, John explained that the situation is much better than it was before. A few years ago I would have seen sewage-filled alleys. The first Step Ahead micro-entrepreneur we came across was at her stand selling confectionary items.  She said she uses the loans to buy “stuff to sell”. Another woman has a restaurant serving food through a window facing the alley. Finally, we came to a family business close to a pond turned into a sewage and trash dump.  Outside of their home were bathtubs filled with water and chickens’ feet. This family processes chicken feet to be sold at the market.  The family told us that the helpers (who come to de-bone the feet) and the buyers have not been coming as regularly – and they did not know why. One member of the family was a single dad of 3 kids.

We continued to walk through the community meeting local citizens and observing their daily lives.  Because of the support of Step Ahead the local citizens can continue to run their businesses and not have to go to loan sharks that charge high interest rates while emotionally and physically bullying their loaners if money is not repaid back on time. Despite difficult situations, economic instability, and families affected by HIV/AIDS everyone was hopeful, inspiring, and committed to making theirs’ and others’ situations better.

Find out more at: Step Ahead and Support 100 Thai Prisoners And Families With HIV

Flood Relief in Thailand – Where are they now, Part 2

On June 5, I accompanied World Vision International staff to see where the communities are today that received emergency flood relief.

When we arrived to the village in Chinat Province, the community was receiving first-aid training and how to drive boats in flooding circumstances through the Disaster Risk Reduction program. This community was supported by WVI when the floods hit with survival kits and child-friendly spaces. At the first-aid training, the instructor made sure to emphasize the importance of rescuing the lives of neighbors in addition to family while demonstrating how to do CPR and carrying an injured victim on a stretcher. After, the staff and I observed the boat driving training, and we even were able to participate. The community has never been educated on prevention activities in case of disaster until WVI and the local government teamed up to implement these trainings. Yajai from WVI explained, this program exists because we would like to educate citizens to help themselves and neighbors when other relief can’t be here immediately. Before, the village depended only on the head and leaders to make decisions, but now everyone is trained to help.


Meeting with families who received support from World Vision International, they explained that the floods happen every year but last year was the worst ever. This flood forced a family that has 3 children to move to the main road to live in a tent for 3 months. The mother said the house was flooded to the knee.  During the flooding she volunteered to cook for other villages. Now she and her family have been able to return home with government support. I asked if she was worried about the flooding happening again, and she said no because she has to accept what comes. At the DRR training, she was learning first-aid and “how to help in the right way when a disaster or emergency happens,” the mother shared.

See the water line on the second floor…

Next we visited a school that had 250 students from kindergarten to 9th grade. A director and teacher shared that for 3 months the school had to shut down. Some families lived on the street. The community was devastated because it is a town of farmers, and the main road was destroyed so there was not any transport making it hard to leave and receive emergency supplies. Here WVI fixed the playground, landscape, cement, and provided books, 2 computers, sports equipment, and school supplies. Again the issue was reiterated that although it floods every year, it has never flooded like that before so no one was completely prepared. We sat with some students, and I asked them in their words what happened. The girls all jumped in adding on to each other that every year it floods to their knees but last year it went up to the roof of their homes.  They moved to the main road and lived there for 3 months. Many of the girls became depressed hoping the water would recede quickly. They had to miss school and did not have anything with them – when the waters rose it happened so fast they had to leave almost everything behind. What did they miss most? Their books, one girl answered. The rest nodded agreeing. I asked if they were worried about the floods continuing to be this bad, and they said no – because they “believe in the good, that the good will happen.”

Finally we visited families that received livelihoods support from WVI after the flood waters receded. Working through the village leader, WVI selected the poorest families and supported the purchase of new income generating activities, for example: chicks and chickens, mushroom growing, or catfish farms.


I want to thank WVI staff on their hospitality and taking me along to experience and report on the impact GlobalGiving donors had on flood and emergency relief.

GlobalGiving InTheField Representative | Texas

Jacqueline is an InTheField Traveler with GlobalGiving and is now making her way across Southeast Asia. Jacqueline has lived all around the U.S., Central America, backpacked along Australia’s eastern coast while volunteering for the National Park Service, western Europe, and traveled around the world. You can also follow her via Twitter.

For more information about GlobalGiving, click here. 

Providing light, energy, and livelihoods to displaced ethnic communities

On May 28, I was able to visit the Shan village that received solar lighting from The Branch Foundation. I saw where the community is now and the impact the solar panels as well as the support of The Branch Foundation has made on their lives.

After a short visit at The Branch Foundation (TBF) Chiang Mai office, we were off a few days later to the Shan community that received the solar panels.  Walking through the village we discussed with community members and the village chief about what is still happening in Burma/Myanmar. They said the situation is still not safe for communities like the Shan and Karen to return. As we were speaking, a landmine went off in the distance. The areas, between the Thai-Burma border and within the ethnic communities in Burma, are littered with landmines that are accidentally discovered by people and animals.  I asked one of the community members if he wanted to go back? He said, “we want to but everything was taken and we lost relatives. We are afraid it will happen again.”

Solar panels on village roofs
Solar panels on village roofs

Walking through the unofficial refugee camp, I saw solar panels on the houses’ roofs. Iona, the Executive Director and Founder, explained that the poorest families received the panels first, then the remaining families received theirs so that the whole village has access to lighting and electricity at night.  At one of the houses, we met “grandpa” – a village elder. He lost is wife, “grandma”, and lived alone. When he welcomed us into his home he shared the story he has told many visitors before about his history in Burma/Myanmar and then demonstrated the light he receives now because of the panel. I asked what he used the light for, and he replied for cooking at night.  Another village elder (who says she is 90) explained she also uses the lights at night to cook. Why is this important? Because in the day community members are working which does not leave time to prepare food and/or study. By having light at night to do basic life activities, they are able to spend the daytime increasing income for the families – improving livelihoods.

The Branch Foundation was a part of the community – welcomed like a family – and because I came with TBF, I was new family too. Everywhere we went community members came out to speak with us, share news in the family (1 woman just received a new GREAT granddaughter in the family), and sit to laugh swapping stories.  These solar panels have made, and are still creating, an incredible impact in the community which does not receive electricity in homes from the state since it is not an “official” refugee camp; without documents this community cannot receive services from the state but cannot return back to their home country either – a stateless community.

"Grandpa" with his solar light
“Grandpa” with his solar light

Visiting a community member
Visiting a community member’s home

Solar light now allows time to increase income
Solar light now allows time to increase income

After seeing the solar lighting project, I was able to see how TBF is providing alternative livelihoods in this village supporting the set up, branding, and selling of micro-weaving products with vibrant beautiful colors and quality. Additionally, the village chief shared how he is trying out other alternative energies with his “rice-husk powered stove”. It takes the left-over thrown away portions of rice post-harvest and uses it to fuel a cooking stove. See more pictures of my visit, the micro-weaving work, and the rice-husk powered stove below…

 To support The Branch Foundation’s current project: Emergency Relief Fund Southeast Asia

Flood Relief in Thailand – Where are they now, Part 1

Part 1 is dedicated to my site visit with Global Vision Charitable Trust in Lop Buri, Thailand:

BEFORE: School in Lop Buri flooded almost up to second floor (Source: GVI Archive, Jax)

After one of the worst flooding in Thailand, Global Vision International Charitable Trust responded by providing relief and assistance so that communities could rebuild themselves.  On June 1, I was able to accompany GVI to one of its flood relief projects at a school in Lopburi.

GVI works with local groups and organizations to support communities. This specific one was in dire need of rebuilding its school that had to shut down for 2 months due to the flooding. During this time students had to stay at home and fell behind the rest of their peers where the flooding did not reach or subsided quickly.

Sitting with school staff and patron (the monk) learning about what really happened with the flooding

GVI was informed by a contact about the emergency situation, so they went out to survey the area. Before, community members had to walk through the water and take boats around the town.  Some of the staff at the school shared that GVI was the first people they saw handing out water in the emergency situation.   This school has 125 students from preschool to 6th grade with many from the hill-tribe areas. Some students have to sleep at the school since they live in such remote areas. During the flooding these students all had to return to their homes with no education, school, and away from their friends for 2 months.

One of the teachers explained that they were preparing for flooding, but the news never gave a clear timeframe for when the waters would arrive. By the time it arrived, within an hour almost the entire first floor was under water. She said the last big flood was about 16 years ago, but the school has never flooded like this before.  At the end, I asked the main supporter and patron of this school (a local monk) why he was so passionate and committed. He explained he was born in this town, studied at this school, and the monk he studied under had started the school. He wanted to continue it – it was the first and largest in the village.

The before and after pictures of the flooding are incredible. GVI was able to help bring volunteers to clean up flood water lines, repaint, rebuild walls that were rotted and or washed away, clean up furniture, and salvage what could be reused. They also rebuilt the gardens (where students learn about where food comes from and use the vegetables for meal times) and the playground.  GVI volunteers helped bring new bedding for the boarding rooms and new books since many were destroyed in the water that rose too fast to move everything upstairs.  GVI was one of the first to respond to the flood in this community. With the support of donations through GlobalGiving, children have returned to school. I am thankful to Jax, Apple, and GVI staff for taking me to see where the communities affected by the flooding are today.

Before and After Pictures:

BEFORE: flooded classroom (from GVI archive)

AFTER:cleaned, rebuilt, and restocked classroom

BEFORE: School gardens and playground damaged from flooding (SOURCE: GVI Archive)

AFTER: Gardens rebuilt

AFTER:  Playgrounds rebuilt

AFTER: Local school rebuilt, re-opened,and children back at school

Providing education for marginalized migrant youth in Thailand

DEPDC students

DEPDC students headed to class

GlobalGiving and donors have helped DEPDC fund many projects like a clean water source for the center and the education building that provides a free school in the day and a community-learning center in the evenings. Additionally, funds have helped provide education grants to send migrant children to school, provided a computer classroom, is currently fundraising to send 200 at risk children to school, and offering community learning center classes including English and business training. DEPDC supports the community in Mae Sai near the Thai-Burma border including Burmese children living in the border area and hill-tribe communities nearby.

Once within the facilities – I was greeted with children playing and bright colored buildings. At the front of the main building, immediately I saw a big sign over a door thanking GlobalGiving for the computer lab. I was then guided  on a tour of the DEPDC education building.

First I saw Child Voice Radio – a DJ training facility where students can learn how to DJ a radio station and speak on issues.  Then we went over to the broadcasting area – complete with stage, couches, and lighting as if ready for a talk show. Here DEPDC creates YouTube videos and provides opportunities for students to create alongside as well. Among these vocational training opportunities students can learn agriculture, weaving, and even intern through a youth leadership program. This is part of the Half Day Program where students receive formal education for half the day and vocational training of their choice the other half.

During my tour, I witnessed students in class, learning everything from math to teamwork and trust.  One of the classes for the older students occurred only on Fridays and focused on peace, self-confidence, and Thai culture. DEPDC provides a completely free education as opposed to the local Thai schools that are “free” but require students to pay for uniforms and books, which many families cannot afford. DEPDC also offers the opportunity for students who start kindergarten at 12 years old (because they could not attend before for many various reason) to learn at their level, comfort, and ability.  In addition to supporting youth in the day, these facilities host evening, community courses open to all community members.

DEPDC students in class

DEPDC students in class
Teamwork and Trust Activity

Teamwork and Trust Activity
GlobalGiving everywhere!

What is the impact? A majority of DEPDC students have no documentation or identification, are migrants that face poverty and discrimination, are unprotected and targeted by traffickers, and unaware of trafficking dangers. Now over 4000 children have been helped by DEPDC and provided an educational opportunity, vocational training, and self-empowerment to make informed decisions when facing dangers of poverty and trafficking.

GlobalGiving InTheField Representative | Texas

Jacqueline is an InTheField Traveler with GlobalGiving and is now making her way across Southeast Asia. Jacqueline has lived all around the U.S., Central America, backpacked along Australia’s eastern coast while volunteering for the National Park Service, western Europe, and traveled around the world. You can also follow her via Twitter.

For more information about GlobalGiving, click here.